Mental Health Awareness


Mental health resources

Resources

The following organizations provide information and resources for mental illness:

Severe Anxiety
Overcoming Social Phobia One Step At A Time
A well-written site about Social Phobia, resources for help, advice for dealing with the illness, and links to many other sites. “Severe social anxiety is one of the most difficult disorders to overcome. It can literally destroy your life in a matter of months. People do no realize that their is no real treatment to rid yourself of social anxiety, sure there is medication that is available through your family doctor. But how on earth does someone with severe social anxiety get this medication when their number one fear is in social interaction?”
http://www.severe-social-anxiety.com/

Center for Mental Health Services
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Phone: 301-443-8956
http://www.samhsa.gov/

Resource Center to Address Discrimination and Stigma
ADS Center
11420 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD 20852
Toll Free Phone: 1-800-540-0320
Email: stopstigma@samhsa.gov
http://www.stopstigma.samhsa.gov/

Drug Abuse Information and Treatment Referral Line
(Sponsored by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment)
TollFree: 800-622-HELP (4357)

Health Resources and Services Administration Information Center (HRSA)
TollFree: (888) 275-4772
Email: ask@hrsa.gov

National Institute of Mental Health
Office of Communications
Phone: 301-443-4513
Toll Free: 1-866-615-NIMH (6464)
TTY: 301-443-8431
Email: nimhinfo@nih.gov
http://www.nimh.nih.gov

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
Phone: 212-363-3500
Fax: 212-363-6237
Toll Free: 888-333-AFSP
Email: inquiry@afsp.org
http://www.afsp.org/index-1.htm

American Psychiatric Association (APA)
Phone: 703-907-7300
http://www.psych.org/index.cfm

American Psychological Association
Phone: 202-336-5510
Toll Free: 1-800-374-2721
http://www.apa.org

Anxiety Disorders Association of America
Phone: 240-485-1001
http://www.adaa.org

Borderline Personality Disorder Research Foundation (BPDRF)
New York State Psychiatric Institute
Phone: 212-543-6247
Email: BPDRF.USA@VERIZON.NET
http://www.borderlineresearch.org

Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation
Phone: 847-256-8525
http://www.bpkids.org/

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA)
Phone: 312-642-0049
http://www.DBSAlliance.org

Depression and Related Affective Disorders Association (DRADA)
Phone: 410-583-2919
Email: drada@jhmi.edu
http://www.drada.org/

Freedom from Fear
Phone: 718-351-1717
http://www.freedomfromfear.com

National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD)
Phone: 516-829-0091
Toll Free: 800-829-8289
Email: info@narsad.org
http://www.narsad.org

National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI)
Phone: 703-524-7600
Toll Free: 1-800-950-NAMI (6264)
http://www.nami.org

National Eating Disorders Association
Phone: 206-382-3587
Email: info@NationalEatingDisorders.org
http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org

National Mental Health Association (NMHA)
Phone: 703-684-7722
Toll Free: 1-800-969-6642
TTY: 800-443-5959
http://www.nmha.org

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
National Mental Health Information Center
Toll Free: 800-789-2647
TTY: 866-889-2647
Email: info@mentalhealth.org
http://www.mentalhealth.org

The Reach Institute

The Reach Insitiute

 This 501c3 non-profit has the CEO’s of many of the family advocacy organizations on its board. It’s mission is to ensure that the latest interventions are available in every community by ensuring that health care providers can get trained in the latest methods.

Peter S. Jensen, MD
President & CEO, The REACH Institute
REsource for Advancing Children’s Health
NY, NY



The Alpha-Stim- Microcurrent electrical therapy
Alpha-Stim treats anxiety, insomnia and depression with cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES). CES produces beneficial changes in the brain’s electrical activity and can induce pleasant and relaxed feelings.

The Alpha-Stim SCS treats anxiety, depression, and/or insomnia with microcurrent using a method called cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES).

The treatment is very simple. The current is applied by easy to use clip electrodes that attach on the ear lobes. You may feel a slight tingling sensation under the electrodes, but it is not necessary to feel this in order to achieve results.

Used just 20 to 60 minutes every day, every other day, or on an as-needed basis, CES can help induce a pleasant, relaxed feeling of well being.

The Alpha-Stim SCS is well tolerated and very safe in contrast to drugs used in the treatment of mood disorders, many of which have been proven to have undesirable side effects and can be addictive.
Unlike drugs, the Alpha-Stim SCS leaves the mind alert. Anxiety reduction is usually experienced during treatment. Depression and insomnia control is generally experienced after several weeks of daily treatment. CES can also help treat the underlying mood disorders associated with pain.

The Alpha-Stim SCS may be used as an adjunct to medication and/or psychotherapy. After treatment, there are usually no physical limitations imposed so the majority of people can resume normal activities immediately. Maintenance of a relaxed, yet alert state

is generally achieved with treatments three times per week. As a result, the Alpha-Stim SCS is suitable for clinical or home use.

Treated conditions:
Anxiety
Depression
Insomnia
Examples of situations where CES can provide relief:
Dental visits
Fear of flying and other phobias
Insomnia due to anxiety or stress
Performance anxiety
Jet lag recovery
Use during behavioral therapy sessions
Bereavement and healing
Loss of job, divorce
Hospice and palliative care
Alpha-Stim advantages:
Low incidence of adverse effects
More efficacious than most other forms of therapy
Relatively easy to learn
Alternative in cases refractory to conventional care
Reduces or eliminates need for addictive medications
No tolerance
May be applied on schedule or PRN
May be self-administered by patients
Highly cost effective

 

A brief history of CES

Electrosleep treatment (an older name for CES), involving less than one milliampere of current, came into the USA from Japan in the late 1960s, which, in turn had borrowed it from Russia and other East Block countries. Since the electricity was directed across the head, the FDA renamed it Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation (CES) in 1978, and now allows its marketing in the USA for the treatment of anxiety, depression and insomnia.

A major use of CES has been in the drug abstinence syndrome in which people are withdrawing from various substances of addiction, such as nicotine, alcohol, prescription drugs, cocaine or heroin. All such patients have anxiety, depression and insomnia as defining symptoms of the syndrome, and the vast majority benefit dramatically from the use of CES during the withdrawal period. The medical use of CES is becoming more widely indicated in the USA as these and stress from a myriad of other sources continue to build up in our society. Read more about the mechanism of Alpha-Stim CES.

What scientific research has been conducted with CES?

 

At present, there are over 126 research studies on CES in humans and 29 experimental animal studies. The overwhelming majority of the scientific research is extremely positive. No significant lasting side effects have been reported.

Harvard University School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management found: “The meta-analysis of anxiety showed CES to be significantly more effective than sham (P<.05).” (Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of cranial electrostimulation: efficacy in treating selected psychological and physiological conditions by Dr. Sidney Klawansky et al. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 183(7):478-485, 1995).

Source

 

 

http://alpha-stim.com/